Month: August 2010

Complicated Mechanisms Explained in simple animations

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Radial Engines

Radial engines are used in aircrafts having propeller connected to the shaft delivering power in order to produce thrust its basic mechanism is as follows

Steam engine Principle

Steam engine once used in locomotives was based on the reciprocating principle as shown below

Sewing Machine

Maltese Cross Mechanism

this type of mechanism is used in clocks to power the second hand movement.

Manual Transmission Mechanism

The mechanism also called as “stick shift” is used in cars to change gears mannually

Constant Velocity Joint

This mechanism is used in the front wheel drive cars

Torpedo-Boat destroyer System

This system is used to destroy fleet in naval military operations.

Rotary Engine

Also called as Wankel engine is a type of internal combustion engine has a unique design that converts pressure into rotating motion instead of reciprocating pistons

Sixt Street View

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Sensitive topic in Germany: Google Street View. That’s Sixts answer…

The Tangga House Singapore by Guz Architects

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The tropical nature of Singapore is one that should be embraced in architecture, with structures that make outdoor living central to their experience. 

Bendable bicycle wraps itself around a pole – by design

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Parking your two-wheeler in a shady neighborhood, but left your secondary lock at home? No problem — to protect your wheels, just bend your bike around a nearby post and thread your U-lock through the whole kit at once. That’s the idea behind UK designer Kevin Scott’s folding bicycle, which is rigid enough to freely ride, but releases its flexible ratcheting mechanism when you push a lever on the side. The design won the 21-year-old student £500 at the New Designers exhibition in London this week. He’s presently looking for partners to help commercialize the concept, which looks more practical than some, so we expect it’ll be only a few years before you’ll see his creation zipping down the street. One question, though — why not go the whole nine yards and give it a built-in lock, too?